PI: Associate Professor Md Maruf Hasan


Maj Md Maruf Hasan

Md Maruf Hasan, PhD

Major and Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical Engineering

Military Institute of Science and Technology (MIST), Mirpur Cantonment, Dhaka-1216, Bangladesh.

+88-02-9011362 – Ex-4168
+88001769024168, +88001791986374
+880-02-9011311
maruf.hasan@bme.mist.ac.bd
www.mist.ac.bd

  • 2015-present: Biomedical Engineering Department, MIST, Mirpur Contonment, Mirpur, Dhaka
  • 2014-2015: Manager, Biosafety Office, icddrb, Mohakhali, Dhaka
  • 2012-2014: Postdoc in Neuroimmunology. BRIC, University of Copenhagen. Denmark
  • 2011-2012: Research Assistant (as part of PhD research), University Medical Center, Mainz, Germany
  • 2008-2012: PhD in Neuroimmunology. University of Regensburg, Germany
  • 2005-2007: Master’s in Biotechnology. Lund University, Sweden
  • 1998-2002: Bachelor in Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering. Khulna University, Bangladesh

Cell and Tissue Engineering

Cell and Tissue engineering is one of the most exciting and rapidly growing areas in biomedical engineering that has become potentially instrumental to revolutionize the treatment of a wide variety of disorders and injuries. Tissue engineering is the ability to generate living tissue ex vivo for replacement or therapeutic applications through materials development, biochemical manipulations, cell culture, and genetic engineering.

Cell and Tissue Engineering 1

This aims to understand how cell behavior, cell growth, and differentiation are affected by the mechanochemistry of the cellular environment, the effects of physical contacts between cells, between cells and artificial substrates, and between cells and the extracellular matrix that they produce, the application of this knowledge to generate cellular systems for therapeutics, sensors, and novel tools for research. Our aims are to understand:

  1. The role of TGF-β signaling in cell signaling and differentiation
  2. Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGF-β) -Releasing Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering
  3. Role of MAPK signaling pathway in cell signaling and differentiation

Publications:

  1. Hasan M, Neumann B, Haupeltshofer S, Stahlke S, Fantini MC, Angstwurm K, Bogdahn U and Kleiter I (2015). Activation of TGF-β-induced non-Smad signaling pathways during Th17 differentiation. Immunology & Cell Biology. Impact factor: 4.205
  1. Kleiter I, Song J, Lukas D, Hasan M, Neumann B, Croxford AL, Pedré X, Hövelmeyer N, Yogev N, Mildner A, Prinz M, Wiese E, Reifenberg K, Bittner S, Wiendl H, Steinman L, Becker C, Bogdahn U, Neurath MF, Steinbrecher A, Waisman A. (2010). Smad7 in T cells drives T helper 1 responses in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. BRAIN. Impact factor: 9.91

 

Immunotherapy

Cancer is a complex disease caused by genetic instability and accumulation of multiple molecular alterations. As the population ages and lifespans increase the incidence of cancer will rise. Current diagnostic and prognostic classifications do not reflect the whole clinical heterogeneity of tumors and are insufficient to make predictions for successful treatment and patient outcome. Most current anticancer agents do not greatly differentiate between cancerous and normal cells, leading to systemic toxicity and adverse effects. To this point, target oriented treatment has become indispensible for complete cure of cancer.

In addition, cancer is often diagnosed and treated too late. Hence, therapeutic modalities are limited in their effectiveness. Due to these problems, cancer has overtaken heart disease as the leading cause of death for adults in many countries.  Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics.

Current problems and unmet needs in translational oncology include (a) advanced technologies for tumor imaging and early detection, (b) new methods for accurate diagnosis and prognosis, (c) strategies to overcome the toxicity and adverse side effects of chemotherapy drugs, and (d ) basic discovery in cancer biology leading to new knowledge for treating aggressive and lethal cancer for example Glioblastoma.

Immunotherapy 1

Figure: Expression of PDL-1 and B7.1 on GL-261 (Brain tumor cells), Liu Y et al., 2013.

Immunotherapy and cell therapy has become popular means for the treatment of cancer as well as for many other diseases. Former US president Jimmy carter’s successful cancer turnaround   was because of immunotherapy of a PD-1 blocking antibody which is receptor of Programmed death ligand PDL-1. Our aims are:

  1. To elucidate new mechanisms of cancer progression
  2. To understand the role Neurons or other immune cells for the treatment of cancer.
  3. To find out new molecular candidates for therapeutic purpose.
  4. To produce monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of cancer and other diseases.

Publications:

  1. Liu Y, Carlsson R, Ambjorn M, Hasan M, Badn W, Darabi A, Siesjö P and Issazadeh-Navikas S. (2013). Neuronal-Mediated killing of GL261 is Interferon-β and PD-L1 dependent. Journal of Neuroscience. Impact factor: 7.11

 

Neuroimmunology

Although Neuron-immune system cross-talk during disease development has been studied for many years, the dogma has been that there is little interaction between the immune and nervous systems in healthy individuals. This belief was historically based on indications that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) blocks immune cell infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS), leading to limited immune responses in the CNS, and by a lack of classical immune proteins in

the brain. However, recent observations from both clinical and basic science research have caused a paradigm shift in our understanding of neural-immune interactions, indicating clearly that there is extensive communication between these systems. There is now clear evidence that environmental insults that alter the immune response can affect brain development as well as behavior.

Neuroimmunology of Multiple Sclerosis

Approximately 2.5 million people worldwide are afflicted with multiple sclerosis, a chronic neuroinflammatory disease of the brain and spinal cord that is a common cause of serious physical disability in young adults especially women. Multiple sclerosis poses a major personal and socioeconomic burden: the average age of disease onset is 30 years — a time that is decisive for work and family planning — and 25 years after diagnosis, approximately 50% of patients require permanent use of a wheelchair. There are two major forms of MS. Relapsing-remitting (RR)-MS is the most frequent (85%–90%) and affects women about twice as often as men.

Neuroimmunology 1

Figure: The suppressive role of FoxA1 (induced by IFN-β treatment) in EAE (the animal model of human MS), Liu Y et al., 2014.

There was only one study undertaken about Multiple Sclerosis patients in Bangladesh in the Department of Neurology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, from January 2002 to December 2003. The objective of this study was to determine the initial neurologic symptoms of multiple sclerosis among Bangladeshi patients.

A total of 25 respondents of multiple sclerosis patients as cases selected by McDonald et al. (2001) diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis were enlisted during the study period. Out of 25 cases, male patients were 12 (48%) and females were 13 (52%), ratio being 1:1.08. Majority of the patients presented at second, third and fourth decades of life.

Most of the patients (56%) had acute onset, followed by subacute (28%) and insidious (16%). Certain clinical characteristics among Bangladeshi multiple sclerosis patients are noteworthy, which are different from Caucasian (western) patients. But the molecular analysis of these patients is still unknown due to lack of technology, scientist and financial support. Without molecular analysis it is difficult to select the suitable therapy for the patients. To this point, our aims are:

  1. To understand the molecular mechanisms of MS development in Bangladeshi patients.
  2. To find out the suitable cellular and immunotherapy for Bangladeshi MS patients.
  3. To assess efficacy of IFN-β and Natalizumab treatment for Bangladeshi MS patients.

Publications:

  1. Hoppmann N, Graetz C, Paterka M, Poisa-Beiro L, Larochelle C, Hasan M, Lill CM, Zipp F and Siffrin V. (2014). New candidates for CD4 T-cell pathogenicity in experimental neuroinflmmation and multiple sclerosis. BRAIN, Impact factor: 9.91
  1. Liu Y, Carlsson R, Comabella M, Wang J, Kosicki M, Carrion B, Hasan M, Wu X, Montalban X, Dziegiel MH, Sellebjerg F, Sørensen PS, Helin K. and Issazadeh-Navikas S. (2014). FoxA1 directs the lineage and immunosuppressive properties of a novel regulatory T cell population in EAE and MS. Nature Medicine. Impact factor: 22.86
  1. Kleiter I, Song J, Lukas D, Hasan M, Neumann B, Croxford AL, Pedré X, Hövelmeyer N, Yogev N, Mildner A, Prinz M, Wiese E, Reifenberg K, Bittner S, Wiendl H, Steinman L, Becker C, Bogdahn U, Neurath MF, Steinbrecher A, Waisman A. (2010). Smad7 in T cells drives T helper 1 responses in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Impact factor: 9.91

 

 Neuroimmunology of Autism

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are pervasive neurodevelopmental disorders affecting almost 1/100 children and are characterized by difficulties in social skills, concentration, language, learning and stereotypic behaviors. Immunological and environmental factors, such as diet, infection, and xenobiotics play critical roles in the development of autism. Abnormalities in enzymatic function, autoantibodies to brain proteins, and maternal infections during pregnancy have been indicated in the autism population. Additionally, pathological alterations in genes involved in the patterning of the central nervous system, biochemical pathways, development of dendrites and synapses, and genes associated with the immune system have been observed in this population. Altered T cell response is also found in the Autistic patient. Some proinflammatory cytokines for example IL-1, TNF-α and IL-17 produced by Th17 cells are found to be critical for the development of Autism.

Neuroimmunology 2

Figure: Production of proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 by Th17 cells (Hasan M et al., 2015)

Until recently, autism was thought to be rare. Earlier, prevalence was considered to be 2 to 4 cases per 10,000 children. Currently, it is estimated that the prevalence is as high as 1 in 150 individuals in USA. Extrapolated on the basis of above figure, in Bangladesh nearly 10.5 lakhs individuals may have autism. However, there is no national epidemiological study on autism in Bangladesh. In the centre for Child Development and Autism at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University only 12 children attended with autism in the year 2001, which increased to 105 children in 2009 suggesting probable prevalence, awareness amongst parents and probably increased capability of the paediatricians to diagnose the problem (J Bangladesh Coll Phys Surg 2010; 28: 143-144).

Our aims are:

  1. To assess the altered T cell response in Autistic patients in Bangladesh.
  2. To map the cytokine profile in the Autistic patients in Bangladesh.
  3. To find the genetic factors responsible for developing autism in Bangladeshi patients.

Publications:

  1. Hasan M, Neumann B, Haupeltshofer S, Stahlke S, Fantini MC, Angstwurm K, Bogdahn U and Kleiter I (2015). Activation of TGF-β-induced non-Smad signaling pathways during Th17 differentiation. Immunology & Cell Biology. Impact factor: 4.205

 

Mathematical Modelling and Computational Biomedicine

 

Last updated on Tuesday, August 23, 2016